E Color Diamonds: What Do They Look Like and Are They Worth Buying?

With its scale of letter grades, diamond color might look like the most complicated of the four C's. Don't worry; it's really not. There are just a few important concepts to understand. First is that diamond color is really about its shade of whiteness; that's different than colored diamonds (which can come in a range of hues).

When it comes to diamond color, choosing a loose diamond lower on the color spectrum can be one way to save money on an engagement ring, but some of those color grades spark a debate with their subtle tints of yellow or brown. The E color is not one of those grades; in fact, it's one of the most popular choices for engagement rings. Here are the important things to know about E color diamonds.



What are E color diamonds?

Diamonds are graded on a spectrum: D through F diamonds are considered colorless; G through L diamonds are "near colorless;" and diamonds classed M through Z have traces of color. With Clarity wants you to shop with confidence. That’s why we only carry diamonds graded D through L. We just can’t stand behind lower color grades because we feel that you don’t get an amount of sparkle that will make you smile each and every time you slide the ring on your finger.

e color diamonds in color scale range

But if you’re already considering an E diamond, that’s not a concern. An E color diamond is visually stunning and has very high color purity.



Do E color diamonds look yellow?

No, E color diamonds don't look yellow at all. In fact, it's hard for even a gemologist to tell the difference between a D and E color diamond. To see it, they use particular lighting and place the stones upside down on a white piece of paper — conditions in which you'll never see your own diamond.


e color diamonds in colorless range

How to make sure E color diamonds appear as colorless as possible

To enhance the purity of your E color diamond, set it in either platinum or white gold. Yellow and rose gold will reflect through the diamond, making it look yellower. (Which kind of defeats the point of buying a colorless diamond, if you ask us.)

Also, make sure you get an excellent cut, which largely determines sparkle. The goal is for the stone to show its icy whiteness, and it won't do that optimally if you compromise on the cut of the diamond because it won’t bounce light around in the same way.



Are E color diamonds worth buying?

That depends on your metal preference for the setting. If you're a fan of yellow or rose gold for your engagement ring, an E color diamond is probably not worth buying. (Hey, we tell it like it is.)

But let’s say you like white gold or platinum. An E diamond still might not be your best bet if you’re looking for the perfect compromise between beauty and budget. Just like it's hard for gemologists to tell the difference between a D and an E diamond, the same goes for E and F. An F color diamond is at the edge of the colorless range, so if your heart's set on getting an absolutely colorless diamond, that's the best grade to get the whiteness at a lower price.

e color diamonds in sales compared to other color grades

But E color diamonds are a cost-effective way to get an icy white diamond, instead of opting for a D color diamond.

Have more questions about E color diamonds? Our expert on-staff gemologists are here to help. They're highly experienced at finding the perfect ring for any style and budget, and they can walk you through any diamond's color grade and GIA certificate.

And if you’re not quite ready to discuss a specific stone, you can fill out the form below. Once you tell us your priorities for your diamond, without a specific one in mind, we set our expert gemologists on hunting you down 3 beautiful stones we think you’ll love. They’ll be delivered right to your inbox.


Fill out my online form.